Richard III, or the English Prophet

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Samuel Rowley (1623)


Historical Records

Dramatic Records of Sir Henry Herbert

J. O. Halliwell-Phillips transcribed a number of Sir Henry Herbert's licensing records and compiled them in various scrapbooks now held at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Amongst them is the following transcription:

R3 or the English Prophet lge.JPG

The Palsgraves Players__ A Tragedy of Richard the thirde or the English

Prophett with the reformation contayninge 17. sheetes written by
Samuell Rowleye for the companye at the Fortune this 27th. July

1623.. 1.li 0.

(Folger Shakespeare Library, MS W.b.156 ("Fortune"), p41. Reproduce by permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library)


Theatrical Provenance

Licensed by Herbert for performance at the Fortune, by the Palsgrave's Men.


Probable Genre(s)

Tragedy.


Possible Narrative and Dramatic Sources or Analogues

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References to the Play

A jest-book compiled by the Caroline playwright Robert Chamberlain contains a couplet that may have originated in this play:

Sundry mistakes spoken publickly upon the Stage.

IN the Play of Richard the third; the Duke of Buckingham being betraid by his servant Banister, a Messenger comming hastily into the presence of the King, to bring him word of the Dukes surprizall, Richard asking him what newes he replyed:

My Liege, the Duke of Banister is tane,
And Buckingham is come for his reward.

(Chamberlain, A new booke of mistakes [1637], D1v)




Critical Commentary

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For What It's Worth

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Works Cited

Chamberlain, Robert. A new booke of mistakes.. London: N.O., 1637.



Site created and maintained by David McInnis, University of Melbourne; updated 16 March 2017.