Difference between revisions of "Portio and Demorantes"

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'''Wiggins''' (680) notes Sibley's suggestion but regards it as unlikely because whenever the Revels Office scribe was clearly confused about proper names, he left blanks rather than attempting to offer a solution. Wiggins points to [[Soldan and the Duke of —]] as a prime example.
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'''Wiggins''' (680) notes Sibley's endorsement but regards it as unlikely because whenever the Revels Office scribe was clearly confused about proper names, he left blanks rather than attempting to offer a solution. Wiggins points to [[Soldan and the Duke of —]] as a prime example.
 
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==For What It's Worth==
 
==For What It's Worth==
  

Revision as of 23:26, 19 March 2017

Anon. (1580)


Historical Records

Theatrical Provenance

Performed by Sussex's men on Candlemas (02 February 1580) in the evening, at Whitehall Palace before Elizabeth I.


Probable Genre(s)

Romance (?) (Harbage); History (Revels account).


Possible Narrative and Dramatic Sources or Analogues

<Enter any information about possible or known sources. Summarise these sources where practical/possible, or provide an excerpt from another scholar's discussion of the subject if available.>


References to the Play

<List any known or conjectured references to the lost play here.>


Critical Commentary

Sibley implicitly endorses J. de Perott's conjecture that the subject matter could be Lamorat and Porcia from the 1548 French version of Amadis de Grecia (1542).

Wiggins (680) notes Sibley's endorsement but regards it as unlikely because whenever the Revels Office scribe was clearly confused about proper names, he left blanks rather than attempting to offer a solution. Wiggins points to Soldan and the Duke of — as a prime example.


For What It's Worth

<Enter any miscellaneous points that may be relevant, but don't fit into the above categories. This is the best place for highly conjectural thoughts.>


Works Cited

<List all texts cited throughout the entry, except those staple texts whose full bibliographical details have been provided in the masterlist of Works Cited found on the sidebar menu. Use the coding below to format the list>

citation goes here

<If you haven't done so already, also add here any key words that will help categorise this play. Use the following format, repeating as necessary:>


Site created and maintained by David McInnis, University of Melbourne; updated 20 March 2017.