Difference between revisions of "Caesar and Pompey"

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Stephen Gosson, ''Plays Confuted in Five Actions'' (1582), D4<sup>v</sup>-[D5<sup>v</sup>] ([http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/a01951.0001.001/67?page=root;size=125;vid=6069;view=text EEBO-TCP, open access]):
 
Stephen Gosson, ''Plays Confuted in Five Actions'' (1582), D4<sup>v</sup>-[D5<sup>v</sup>] ([http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/a01951.0001.001/67?page=root;size=125;vid=6069;view=text EEBO-TCP, open access]):
 
<blockquote>if a true Historie be taken in hand, it is made like our shadows, longest at the rising and falling of the Sunne, shortest of all at hie noone. For the Poets driue it most commonly vnto such pointes, as may best showe the maiestie of their pen, in Tragicall speaches; or set the hearers a gogge, with discourses of love; or painte a fewe antickes, to fitt their owne humors, with scoffes & tauntes; or wring in a shewe, to furnish the Stage, when it is to bare; when the matter of it selfe comes shorte of this, they followe the practise of the cobler, and set their teeth to the leather to pull it out.<br>
 
<blockquote>if a true Historie be taken in hand, it is made like our shadows, longest at the rising and falling of the Sunne, shortest of all at hie noone. For the Poets driue it most commonly vnto such pointes, as may best showe the maiestie of their pen, in Tragicall speaches; or set the hearers a gogge, with discourses of love; or painte a fewe antickes, to fitt their owne humors, with scoffes & tauntes; or wring in a shewe, to furnish the Stage, when it is to bare; when the matter of it selfe comes shorte of this, they followe the practise of the cobler, and set their teeth to the leather to pull it out.<br>
So was the history of Caesar and Pompey, and the Playe of the Fabii at the Theater, both amplified there, where the Drummes might walke, or the pen ruffle, when the history swelled, and ran to hye for the number of y<sup>e</<sup> persons, that shoulde playe it, the Poet with Proteus cut the same fit to his owne measure; when it afoorded no pompe at al, he brought it to the racke, to make it serue. Which inuinciblie proueth on my side, that Plays are no Images of trueth, because sometime they hādle such thinges as neuer were, sometime they runne vpon truethes, but make them séeme longer, or shorter, or greater, or lesse then they were, according as the Poet blowes them vp with his quill, for aspiring heades; or minceth them smaller, for weaker stomakes.</blockquote><br>
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So was the history of Caesar and Pompey, and the Playe of the Fabii at the Theater, both amplified there, where the Drummes might walke, or the pen ruffle, when the history swelled, and ran to hye for the number of y<sup>e</sup> persons, that shoulde playe it, the Poet with Proteus cut the same fit to his owne measure; when it afoorded no pompe at al, he brought it to the racke, to make it serue. Which inuinciblie proueth on my side, that Plays are no Images of trueth, because sometime they hādle such thinges as neuer were, sometime they runne vpon truethes, but make them séeme longer, or shorter, or greater, or lesse then they were, according as the Poet blowes them vp with his quill, for aspiring heades; or minceth them smaller, for weaker stomakes.</blockquote><br>
  
 
==Theatrical Provenance==
 
==Theatrical Provenance==

Revision as of 07:22, 22 July 2015

Anon. (1580)

This page is under construction.

Historical Records

Stephen Gosson, Plays Confuted in Five Actions (1582), D4v-[D5v] (EEBO-TCP, open access):

if a true Historie be taken in hand, it is made like our shadows, longest at the rising and falling of the Sunne, shortest of all at hie noone. For the Poets driue it most commonly vnto such pointes, as may best showe the maiestie of their pen, in Tragicall speaches; or set the hearers a gogge, with discourses of love; or painte a fewe antickes, to fitt their owne humors, with scoffes & tauntes; or wring in a shewe, to furnish the Stage, when it is to bare; when the matter of it selfe comes shorte of this, they followe the practise of the cobler, and set their teeth to the leather to pull it out.
So was the history of Caesar and Pompey, and the Playe of the Fabii at the Theater, both amplified there, where the Drummes might walke, or the pen ruffle, when the history swelled, and ran to hye for the number of ye persons, that shoulde playe it, the Poet with Proteus cut the same fit to his owne measure; when it afoorded no pompe at al, he brought it to the racke, to make it serue. Which inuinciblie proueth on my side, that Plays are no Images of trueth, because sometime they hādle such thinges as neuer were, sometime they runne vpon truethes, but make them séeme longer, or shorter, or greater, or lesse then they were, according as the Poet blowes them vp with his quill, for aspiring heades; or minceth them smaller, for weaker stomakes.


Theatrical Provenance

Performed c. 1581 at the Theatre, possibly by Warwick's Men, as suggested by Wiggins (entry 685).



Probable Genre(s)

Classical history (Harbage).



Possible Narrative and Dramatic Sources or Analogues

The conflict between Caesar and Pompey was available to English playwrights through a wide range of sorces, notably Plutarch's Lives, Appian's Civil Wars, Lucan's Civil War, Suetonius's Lives of the Caesars.
It is impossible to establish which source was used but it is possible briefly to summarise the main events of the conflict.


References to the Play

<List any known or conjectured references to the lost play here.>


Critical Commentary

<Summarise any critical commentary that may have been published by scholars. Please maintain an objective tone!>


For What It's Worth

<Enter any miscellaneous points that may be relevant, but don't fit into the above categories. This is the best place for highly conjectural thoughts.>


Works Cited

<List all texts cited throughout the entry, except those staple texts whose full bibliographical details have been provided in the masterlist of Works Cited found on the sidebar menu. Use the coding below to format the list>

citation goes here


Site created and maintained by Domenico Lovascio, University of Genoa; updated 05 July 2015.